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Showing posts with label net neutrality. Show all posts



Showing posts with label net neutrality. Show all posts








The mobile data apocalypse, and what it means to you



The mobile industry is now completing a huge shift in its attitude
toward mobile data.  Until pretty recently, the prevailing attitude
among mobile operators was that data was a disappointment.  It had
been hyped for a decade, and although there were some successes, it
had never lived up to the huge growth expectations that were set at
the start of the decade.  Most operators viewed it as a nice
incremental add-on rather than the driver of their businesses.But in
the last year or so, the attitude has shifted dramatically from "no
one is using mobile data" to "oh my God, there's so much demand for
mobile data that it'll destroy the network."  A lot of this attitude
shift was caused by the iPhone, which has indeed overloaded some
mobile networks.  But there's also a general uptick in data usage from
various sources, and the rate of growth seems to be
accelerating.Extrapolating the trend, most telecom analyst firms are
now producing mobile data traffic forecasts that look something like
this:The forecasts are driven by a couple of simple
observations:--Smartphones produce much more data traffic than
traditional mobile phones.  Cisco estimates that a single smartphone
produces as much data traffic as 40 traditional feature phones.  So
converting 10 million people from feature phones to smartphones is
like adding 390 million new feature phone users, in terms of impact on
the data network.  The more popular smartphones get, the busier the
network becomes.--A notebook PC generates far more traffic than a
smartphone.  According to Cicso, a single notebook computer generates
the same data traffic as 450 feature phones.  As notebook users
convert to 3G-enabled netbooks and add 3G dongles to their computers,
they dramatically increase the data traffic load on the network.You
can read Cisco's analysis here.This becomes especially interesting
when you look at the forecasts for growth of 3G-equipped netbooks and
notebooks.  Mobile operators in many countries have started
subsidizing sales of those devices if you pay for a data service plan.
 It's an attractive deal for many people.  Say your son or daughter is
going off to college.  Do you buy them a regular notebook computer and
also pay for the DSL service to their apartment, or do you buy them a
3G data plan for about the same price as DSL and get the netbook for
free?The forecasting firm In-Stat recently predicted that by 2013, 30%
of all notebook computers will be sold through mobile operators and
bundled with 3G data plans (link).  Notebook computer sales worldwide
are about 150 million units a year, so that's 45 million new 3G
notebooks a year -- or the data equivalent of adding 20 billion more
feature phones to the network every year.Jeepers.These forecasts are
producing a behind-the-scenes panic among mobile network operators. 
The consensus is that there's no way their networks can grow quickly
enough to support all that data traffic.  There are several
reasons:--They can't afford to build that much infrastructure.--Even
if they could afford the buildout, they won't have enough bandwidth
available to carry all that data, even with 4G.--Traffic-shaping
techniques like tiered pricing and usage caps can't restrain usage
growth enough to save them, because--Fear of losing customers to a
competitor will force them to continue to subsidize sales of 3G
dongles and offer relatively generous caps in their data plans.There
are a number of projections that show the operators losing money on
wireless data a few years from now, as costs continue to increase
faster than revenue.  The danger isn't so much that they will all go
broke, but they're very afraid that they'll turn into zero-profit
utilities.Many operators now seem to be counting on WiFi as their
ultimate savior.  The theory is that if they can offload enough of the
data traffic from their networks to WiFi base stations connected to
wired networks, then maybe other measures like 4G, usage caps, and
aggressive improvements to the network will let them squeak
through.It's an ironic situation.  For a long time the mobile
operators thought of themselves as the future lords of data
communication.  All devices would have 3G connections, the thinking
went, and the fixed-line data carriers such as Comcast and BT would
fade away just like the fixed-line voice companies are doing.Instead,
the new consensus is that we're moving to a world where the fixed-line
vendors will be expected to carry most consumer data traffic for the
foreseeable future.  They'll provide your wireless connectivity at
home and work, while the mobile network will fill in the gaps when
you're on the move.  The area of disagreement, of course, is who will
get the majority of the access revenue.  We'll let the fixed-line and
mobile operators argue over that one; I want to talk about some of the
other impacts of this weird new hybrid wireless world that we're
heading into.(I touched on some of this in my post on net neutrality a
couple of weeks ago (link), but I want to go into more detail
here.)The brave new world of scarce mobile bandwidthBuilt-in WiFi is
now good.  For a long time many mobile operators resisted selling
smartphones with WiFi built in.  They viewed WiFi networks as
competitors for customer control, and wanted to prevent usage of them.
 Now that they see WiFi as their savior, the operators are suddenly
encouraging its inclusion in phones.  Don't be surprised if in the
near future it becomes impossible to get a subsidized price for any
smartphone that doesn't have WiFi built in.Traffic shaping is a fact
of life, and a likely source of irritation.  Many mobile operators are
starting to limit the performance of applications that consume the
most data bandwidth (today that's mostly video and file sharing).  
It's already being done today, and in most cases the operators won't
even tell you they're doing it, unless the government requires them
to.  Certain apps will just communicate more slowly, or fail
altogether, when the network gets busy.There are a couple of
exceptions where operators have been more public about their traffic
shaping activity.  The 3 network in the UK recently announced
restrictions (link).  And O2 in the UK has given details on exactly
which applications it restricts in its home wireless data service
(link).Current traffic shaping hasn't generated a firestorm of
complaints from the average customer (as distinct from net neutrality
advocates), in part because it is very hard for users to tell why a
website runs slowly on a particular day.  But as mobile traffic
continues to increase, operators are going to find that it's cheaper
to ratchet up the restrictions bit by bit rather than pay for more
capacity.  Eventually people will notice, and I worry that we'll end
up in a situation in which the operators carefully balance out how
much they can piss off their customers without creating an outright
revolt.  It's a lot like the way the US airline industry operates
today, and it's a miserable experience for everyone involved.What to
do.  There are better ways to shape traffic.  I think operators should
give customers more information on how much data they're using at any
given time, so they can manage it themselves.  Then let them make an
informed decision about which apps they'll use their bandwidth on.  It
would be relatively simple to create an on-screen widget showing how
much data is being transferred at any time, just like the signal
strength and battery life indicators on today's phones.It's also
possible to create some APIs that would tell a website how much
bandwidth is available to it, so the developer could adjust its
features accordingly.  This idea is being tossed around between web
companies and operators, but I don't know how much is actually being
done about it.Combine those changes with usage-based pricing (my next
point) and customers will shape their own traffic.  Then there won't
be any need for covert manipulation of the network.Say hello to capped
data plans.  Completely unlimited wireless data plans are not
sustainable long term; the economics of them just don't work.  And in
fact, virtually no data plans today are completely uncapped; there is
almost always some fine print about the maximum amount of traffic
allowed before surcharges kick in or the user is tossed off the
network.Some people are saying that the operators should go back to
charging by the byte, and in some parts of the world (particularly
Asia), there is a long history of per-byte pricing.  But the
experience in most of the world has been that per-byte pricing makes
users so nervous about their expenses that they won't use data
services at all.(DoCoMo in Japan has an interesting hybrid approach
(link) in which it charges per-packet until the user hits a maximum
charge of about $70 per month.  Additional usage beyond that cap is
free.  So that's capped pricing rather than capped usage.  This
reduces customer fear of accidentally running up a gigantic bill, but
I wonder how DoCoMo prevents power users from flooding the network
with traffic.  Maybe there's a second, hidden cap on total usage.)What
to do.  I think the right answer in most of the world is going to be
flat-rate data plans in which there's a clearly-communicated cap, with
tiered charges beyond that.  The cap will need to be set at a level
that moderate users won't ever reach, so they don't become gun-shy
about data.  To alleviate the fear of accidentally running up a huge
bill, there will also need to be an on-device meter showing how much
of the user's monthly data allocation has been used (just telling them
to go look at a website is not enough; it should be on-screen).  I'm
told that on-screen meters like this are already being offered on
netbooks by some European operators.Today most operators are pretty
up-front about communicating the data limits when a computer is
connected to a mobile network.  But many of them are still deceptive
toward smartphone customers.  AT&T's Smartphone Personal service,
for example, promises the following for $35 a month:Included Data: 
Unlimited; Additional data:  $0 per MBSounds pretty straightforward. 
No asterisks, no fine print.  But if you click on the terms of service
(link), you'll find a long list of banned application types, followed
by this general provision:"AT&T reserves the right to (i) deny,
disconnect, modify and/or terminate Service, without notice, to
anyone...whose usage adversely impacts its wireless network or service
levels or hinders access to its wireless network... and (ii) otherwise
protect its wireless network from harm, compromised capacity or
degradation in performance."In other words, if the network is getting
slow, they can do anything to your service, at any time, without
notice.There is also a hidden 5G per month maximum:"If you are on a
data plan that does not include a monthly MB/GB allowance and
additional data usage rates, you agree that AT&T has the right to
impose additional charges if you use more than 5 GB in a month."This
is not just an American problem.  Orange in the UK calls its iPhone
data service "unlimited," but there's a footnote saying that
"unlimited" actually means 750 megabytes a month, a surprisingly low
cap compared to AT&T's.If we're ever going to collectively manage
mobile network overload, we'll all need to be much more up-front about
the way it operates and what a particular service plan will and won't
do.Is residential 3G really a good idea?  Especially in Europe, it's
common for operators to tell people that they should ditch their DSL
or cable modem at home and replace it with a 3G modem.  That works out
well only when the network has excess capacity.  As soon as the
networks start to get congested, the operators will need to offload
traffic to residential WiFi routers connected to DSL or cable.  If
those residential fixed lines have been removed, the operators can't
offload.What to do.  I think this one is going to be self-limiting. 
Once 3G bandwidth gets scarce, the operators will realize that they
can get a lot more revenue feeding data to smartphones than to PCs. 
The math works like this:  With a given amount of bandwidth, you could
support a single notebook computer and charge about $50 a month, or
support 11 smartphones at $30 a month each.  Hmm, $330 a month versus
$50, seems like a pretty easy decision.But there are two circumstances
in which it would make sense for the operators to keep subsidizing PC
sales:       1.  If smartphone sales plateau.  If this happens,
eventually the network will catch up with demand and then there will
be excess capacity for PCs; or       2.  If operators can route most
of the actual data traffic from PCs through WiFi connected to
landlines.  In this case they could sell you data plans knowing that
you won't affect their networks much.  That brings us to the next
point...Operators have a huge vested interest in unlocking WiFi access
points.  Most WiFi access points today are encrypted and inaccessible
to other devices in the area.  I think there's a strong financial
incentive for mobile operators to work with fixed-line access
companies to get those access points unlocked.  The benefit for the
wireless companies is clear -- the more WiFi points they can talk to,
the fewer cell towers they need to build.  But the benefits for the
fixed-line operators are much less clear.  Why should they help the
mobile operators with their bandwidth crunch?What to do.  The ideal
situation would be a revenue-sharing deal in which the operators share
some money with the fixed-line companies to encourage them to open up
access to their networks.  In this scenario, your DSL or cable
provider would give you a WiFi router that has been pre-configured to
automatically and securely share excess bandwidth with mobile devices
in the area.  Your own traffic would get priority, but any extra
capacity could be shared automatically.  The benefit for you as a
consumer would be a free router, and/or a lower DSL bill as the cable
company passes along some of the revenue it gets from the mobile
operators.The effectiveness of this sort of approach is going to
depend on the relative cost for an operator of subsidizing a set of
WiFi base stations in an area, versus the cost of installing more
wireless capacity.  I wonder about weird scenarios like a DSL provider
auctioning off excess WiFi capacity to wireless operators in a
particularly congested area.Femtocells for the rest of us.  Another
very logical step for the operators is to start pushing femtocells
aggressively. (Femtocells are radios that work like a short-range cell
tower, but are the size of a WiFi router.  You connect one to your DSL
or cable line, and it offloads traffic from the wireless network. 
Link)What to do.  Today femtocells are generally sold as signal
boosters in areas with marginal wireless coverage.  But in the future
I think it may make sense for operators to give away femtocells, or at
least subsidize them, for customers who live in areas where the data
network is congested.What it all means: Fixed-mobile convergence with
a twistIf you step back from the details, the big picture is that we
really need a single integrated data network that encompasses mobile
and fixed connections, and switches between them seamlessly.  People
have been talking about this sort of thing for years (check out the
Wikipedia article on fixed-mobile convergence here),  but the focus
has generally been on handing voice calls between WiFi and cellular. 
That's hard to do technologically (because you can't interrupt a voice
conversation during the handover for more than a fraction of a
second).  Besides, it doesn't solve a significant customer problem --
the voice network isn't the thing that's overloaded.The place where we
could really, really use fixed-mobile convergence is in data.  I'm
worried, though, that the intense competition between the wireless and
wired worlds will make it difficult and slow to achieve the
coordination needed.  This might be a useful place for government to
put its attention.  Not in terms of regulating the integrated network
into existence (that would be the kiss of death), but to grease the
skids for cooperation between the mobile and fixed-line worlds.Just
one more thing...Everything above is based on the assumption that
those Cisco and analyst forecasts are correct.  But Cisco has a vested
interest in hyping fear of the data apocalypse (Emergency!  Buy more
routers now!!), and my general rule about tech analysts is that every
time they all agree on something you should bet against them.There is
a genuine crunch in mobile data capacity going on at the moment; you
can read about network outages caused by the iPhone even today.  And I
can assure you that for every network failure you read about, there
are dozens of other failures and near-failures that don't get
reported.  Many wireless data networks are very stressed.And the
situation will get worse.But there's no such thing as infinite demand.
 At some point the growth of mobile data will slow down, and it's very
important to try to estimate how and when that'll happen, so we as an
industry do not overshoot too badly.  The question isn't whether the
growth forecasts are wrong, it's when they will be wrong.I'll write
about that next week...





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A web guy and a telecom guy talk about net neutrality



It was a nondescript bar in the American Midwest, the sort of place
where working men drop in at the end of the day to unwind before they
head home. You wouldn't expect to find two senior business executives
there, and as I sat in the empty bar at midday I wondered if maybe my
contact had given me a bad lead.  But then the door opened and a
general manager from one of the leading web companies walked in,
followed by a senior VP from one of the US's biggest mobile network
operators.  I hunched down in the shadows of a corner booth and typed
notes quietly as they settled in at the bar.Bartender:  What'll you
have?Telecom executive:  Michelob Light.Web executive:  I'll have a
Sierra Nevada Kellerweis.Bartender:  Keller-what?Web executive:  Um,
Michelob Light.Telecom executive:  Thanks for coming.  Did you have
any trouble finding the place?Web executive:  All I can say is thank
God for GPS.  I've never even been on the ground before between Denver
and New York.Telecom executive:  I wanted to find someplace
nondescript, so we wouldn't be seen together.  The pressure from the
FCC is bad enough already, without someone accusing us of
colluding.Web executive:  No worries, my staff thinks I'm paragliding
in Mexico this weekend.  What's your cover story?Telecom executive: 
Sailboat off Montauk.Web executive:  Sweet.  So, you wanted to talk
about this data capacity problem you have on your network...Telecom
executive:  No, it's a data capacity problem we all have. Your
websites are flooding our network with trivia.  The world's wireless
infrastructure is on the verge of collapse because your users have
nothing better to do all day than watch videos of a drunk guy buying
beer.Web executive:  Welcome to the Internet.  The people rule.  If
you didn't want to play, you shouldn't have run the ads.  Remember the
promises you made? "Instantly download files.  Browse the Web just
like at home.  Stream HD videos.  Laugh at an online video or movie
trailer while travelling in the family car."Telecom executive:  That
was our marketing guys.  They don't always talk to the capacity
planners.  Besides, who could have known that the marketing campaign
would actually work?Web executive:  Don't look at me.  I've never done
a marketing campaign in my life.  I think you should just blame it on
A--Telecom executive:  You promised, no using the A-word.Web
executive:  Sorry.  But I still don't see why this is a problem.  Just
add some more towers and servers and stuff.Telecom executive:  It's
not that simple.  The network isn't designed to handle this sort of
data, and especially not at these volumes.  Right now our biggest
problem is backhaul capacity -- the traffic coming from the cell
towers to our central servers.  But when we fix that, the cell towers
themselves will get saturated.  Fix the towers and the servers will
fall over somewhere.  It's like squeezing a balloon.  We have to
rebuild the whole network.  It's incredibly expensive.Web executive: 
So?  That's what your users pay you for.Telecom executive:  But most
of them are on fixed-rate data plans.  So when we add capacity, we
don't necessarily get additional revenue.  It's all expense and no
profit.  At some point in the not-too-distant future, we'll end up
losing money on mobile data.Web executive:  Bummer.Telecom executive: 
More like mortal threat.  Fortunately, we've figured out how to solve
the problem.  The top five percent of our users produce about 50% of
the network's total traffic.  So we're just going to cap their
accounts and charge more when they go over.Web executive:  Woah!  Hold
on, those are our most important customers you're talking about.  You
can't just shut them down.Telecom executive:  The hell we can't. 
They're leeches using up the network capacity that everyone else
needs.Web executive:  Consumers will never let you impose caps.  You
told them they had unlimited data plans, that's the expectation you
set.  You can't go back now and tell them that their plans are
limited.  They won't understand -- and they won't forgive you.Telecom
executive:  First of all, the plans were never really unlimited in the
first place.  There's always been fine print.Web executive:  Which no
one read.Telecom executive:  Off the record, you may have a point.  On
the record, the fact is that you can retrain users.  Look, you grew up
in California, right?Web executive:  What does that have to do with
anything?Telecom executive:  Once upon a time, there weren't any water
meters in California.  Now most of the major cities have them, and
they'll be required everywhere in a couple of years.  Something that
was once unlimited became limited, and people learned to conserve.Web
executive:  The difference is, I can read my water meter.  You make a
ton of money when people exceed their minutes or message limits, and
you don't warn them before they do it.  If you play the same game with
Internet traffic, it'll scare people away from using the mobile web --
or worse yet you'll invite in the government.  Look what happened with
roaming charges in Europe.Telecom executive:  Jeez, don't even think
about that.  Okay, so we'll need to add some sort of traffic meter so
people will know how much data they're using when they load a page.Web
executive:  Great, that'll discourage people from using Yahoo.Telecom
executive:  Huh?Web executive:  Oops, did I say that out loud?Telecom
executive:  Then there's the issue of dealing with websites and apps
that misuse the network.Web executive:  Not this again.Telecom
executive:  I'm not talking about completely blocking anything, just
prioritizing the traffic a little.  Surely you agree that 911 calls
should get top priority on the network, right?Web executive:  Of
course.Telecom executive:  And that voice calls should take priority
over data?Web executive:  I don't know about that.Telecom executive: 
Oh come on, what good is a telecom network if you can't make calls on
it?Web executive:  (sighs)  Yeah, okay.Telecom executive:  So then
what's wrong with us prioritizing, say, e-mail delivery over video?Web
executive:  Because when you start arbitrarily throttling traffic, I
can't manage the user experience.  My website will work great on
Vodafone's network but not on yours, or my site will work fine on some
days and not on others.  How do you think the customers will feel
about that?Telecom executive:  Not as angry as they will be if the
entire network falls over.  Listen, we're already installing the
software to prioritize different sorts of data packets.  We could be
throttling traffic today and you wouldn't even know it.Web executive: 
But people will eventually figure it out.  They'll compare notes on
which networks work best and they'll migrate to the ones that don't
mess with their applications.  Heck, we'll help them figure it out. 
And if that's not enough, there's always the regulatory option.  The
Republicans are out of office.  They can't protect you on net
neutrality any more.Telecom executive:  You think you're better at
lobbying the government than we are?  We've been doing it for 100
years, pal.  Besides, we have a right to protect our network.Web
executive:  You mean to protect your own services from
competition!Telecom executive:  Parasite!Web executive: 
Monopolist!Telecom executive:  That's it!  It's go time!They both
stood.  The telecom guy grabbed a beer bottle and broke it against the
bar, while the web guy raised a bar stool over his head.  Then the
bartender pulled out a shotgun and pointed it at both of
them.Bartender:  Enough!  I'm sick of listening to you two.  Telecom
guy, you're crazy if you think people will put up with someone telling
them what they can and can't do on the Internet.  The Chinese
government can't make that stick, and unlike them you have
competitors.Web executive:  See?  I told you!Bartender:  Shut up, web
guy!  You keep pretending that the wireless network is infinite when
you know it isn't.  If you really think user experience is important,
you need to start taking the capabilities of the network into account
when you design your apps.Web executive:  Hey, he started it.Telecom
executive:  I did not!Bartender:  I don't care who started it! 
Telecom guy, you need to expose some APIs that will let a website know
how much capacity is available at a particular moment, so they can
adjust their products.  And web guy, you need to participate in those
standards and use them.  Plus you both need to agree on ways to
communicate to a user how much bandwidth they're using, so they can
make their own decisions on which apps they want to use.  That plus
tiered pricing will solve your whole problem.Telecom executive: 
Signaling capacity too.  Don't forget signaling.Bartender:  That's
exactly the sort of detail you shouldn't confuse users with.  Work it
out between yourselves and figure out a simple way to communicate it
to users.  Okay?Web executive:  I guess.Telecom executive:  Yeah,
okay.Bartender.  Good.  Now sit down and start over by talking about
something you can cooperate on.Telecom executive:  All right.  Hey,
what's that guy doing in the corner?  Is that a netbook?Web executive:
 He's a blogger!Bartender:  There's no blogging allowed in
here!Telecom executive and web executive:  Get him!I ran. 
Fortunately, the bar had a back door.  Even more fortunately, the web
guy and the telecom guy got into an argument over who would go through
the door first, and I was able to make my escape.So I don't know how
the conversation ended.  But I do know that I wish that bartender was
running the FCC. 





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document.getElementById('HTML6'), {}, 'displayModeFull'));
_WidgetManager._RegisterWidget('_TextView', new _WidgetInfo('Text4',
'sidebar',{'main': {'varName': '', 'template': '\74b:if
cond\75\47data:title !\75 \46quot;\46quot;\47\76\n\74h2
class\75\47title\47\76\74data:title\76\74/data:title\76\74/h2\76\n\74/b:if\76\n\74div
class\75\47widget-content\47\76\n\74data:content\76\74/data:content\76\n\74/div\76\n\74b:include
name\75\47quickedit\47\76\74/b:include\076'}},
document.getElementById('Text4'), {}, 'displayModeFull'));
_WidgetManager._RegisterWidget('_AdSenseView', new
_WidgetInfo('AdSense1', 'sidebar',{'main': {'varName': '', 'template':
'\74div
class\75\47widget-content\47\76\n\74data:adCode\76\74/data:adCode\76\n\74b:include
name\75\47quickedit\47\76\74/b:include\76\n\74/div\076'}},
document.getElementById('AdSense1'), {}, 'displayModeFull'));
_WidgetManager._RegisterWidget('_HTMLView', new _WidgetInfo('HTML7',
'header',{'main': {'varName': '', 'template': '\74b:if
cond\75\47data:title !\75 \46quot;\46quot;\47\76\n\74h2
class\75\47title\47\76\74data:title\76\74/data:title\76\74/h2\76\n\74/b:if\76\n\74div
class\75\47widget-content\47\76\n\74data:content\76\74/data:content\76\n\74/div\76\n\74b:include
name\75\47quickedit\47\76\74/b:include\076'}},
document.getElementById('HTML7'), {}, 'displayModeFull'));
_WidgetManager._RegisterWidget('_ImageView', new _WidgetInfo('Image1',
'header',{'main': {'varName': '', 'template': '\74b:if
cond\75\47data:title !\75
\46quot;\46quot;\47\76\n\74h2\76\74data:title\76\74/data:title\76\74/h2\76\n\74/b:if\76\n\74div
class\75\47widget-content\47\76\n\74b:if cond\75\47data:link !\75
\46quot;\46quot;\47\76\n\74a expr:href\75\47data:link\47\76\n\74img
expr:alt\75\47data:title\47 expr:height\75\47data:height\47
expr:id\75\47data:widget.instanceId + \46quot;_img\46quot;\47
expr:src\75\47data:sourceUrl\47
expr:width\75\47data:width\47/\76\n\74/a\76\n\74b:else\76\74/b:else\76\n\74img
expr:alt\75\47data:title\47 expr:height\75\47data:height\47
expr:id\75\47data:widget.instanceId + \46quot;_img\46quot;\47
expr:src\75\47data:sourceUrl\47
expr:width\75\47data:width\47/\76\n\74/b:if\76\n\74br/\76\n\74b:if
cond\75\47data:caption !\75 \46quot;\46quot;\47\76\n\74span
class\75\47caption\47\76\74data:caption\76\74/data:caption\76\74/span\76\n\74/b:if\76\n\74/div\76\n\74b:include
name\75\47quickedit\47\76\74/b:include\076'}},
document.getElementById('Image1'), {'resize': false},
'displayModeFull'));
_WidgetManager._RegisterWidget('_HeaderView', new
_WidgetInfo('Header1', 'header'));
_WidgetManager._RegisterWidget('_NavbarView', new
_WidgetInfo('Navbar1', 'navbar'));
_WidgetManager._RegisterWidget('_BlogView', new _WidgetInfo('Blog1',
'main'));

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